Impact Stories

Girl with Husky PuppyIn science, progress is measured in small steps along the way to major discoveries.  By consistently funding the most innovative research, the AKC Canine Health Foundation is realizing both small milestones and major breakthroughs in canine health.  Your support helps us progress towards our goal to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. 

AKC Canine Health Foundation Funded Study of 9/11 Search and Rescue Dogs Enters its Fourteenth Year November 24, 2015

A long-term medical surveillance study which has followed the search and rescue dogs of 9/11 enters its fourteenth year. The study, conducted by Dr. Cindy Otto of the University of Pennsylvania Penn Vet Working Dog Center and funded by the AKC Canine Health Foundation has followed the health and behavior of the 9/11 dogs since October 2001.

Cancer in Dogs Helps to Inform Human Disease September 18, 2015

AKC Canine Health Foundation contributes funding to research linked to discovering new treatment options to benefit both dogs and humans.

Finding Better Options for Joint Repair with Regenerative Medicine February 14, 2014

One of the most common injuries of the stifle is rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). Surgery can repair the ligament, but it does not necessarily help restore other damaged joint tissues. Fortunately, the emerging field of regenerative medicine gives hope that it might be possible to generate such replacement tissues in the lab.

The Big (and Small) Six February 12, 2014

Recently researchers determined that approximately half of the weight differences seen across dog breeds can be explained by variations in and around only six genes. Studies such as this one can provide insight into some of the size differences seen in humans as well as growth-related health concerns in dogs and humans.

Investigating Influenza February 10, 2014

In the middle of winter, it sometimes seems like everyone is down with the flu. However, humans aren’t the only species that can suffer from influenza. Dogs can get it too, and a few years back a novel strain of influenza began showing up in the canine population. With the support of the AKC Canine Health Foundation researchers set out to track the virus across the United States.

Using Technology to Track Disease January 13, 2014

Leptospirosis, which is caused by a waterborne parasite, can infect both dogs and humans. Without effective treatment, it can cause serious kidney and liver damage. It can even lead to death. Researchers from the University of California-Davis have been investigating the spread of leptospirosis using specialized mapping programs.

New Treatment Goes After Notoriously Tough Cancer Stem Cells November 25, 2013

Canine hemangiosarcoma is relatively common in companion animals. It is also relatively difficult to treat, as they quickly become resistant to conventional forms of therapy. Scientists from the University of Minnesota wondered if targeted toxins might be an effective way of addressing cancers. The results were quite promising.

Expanding Our Understanding of Exercise-Induced Collapse May 16, 2013

Once the a genetic test was available for EIC, it quickly became clear that the existence of the DNM1 mutation didn’t explain all cases of EIC. Some Labrador Retrievers with EIC didn’t have both copies of the mutation, others didn’t have copies at all. Therefore, the scientists from the University of Minnesota and the University of Saskatchewan who had developed the test set out to determine if they could understand whether the EIC seen in dogs without the mutation was really the same condition.

The Health Implications of Early Spay and Neuter May 6, 2013

Recently scientists from the University of California-Davis used a large veterinary database to determine what exactly the implications of neutering might be for a breed of dogs that is one of the most popular in the U.S. – the Golden Retriever. The results were fascinating: timing of spay and neuter did affect the risk of a dog developing serious health problems.

Dark Colored Dogs Highlight Cancer's Complexity April 17, 2013

Standard poodles are at risk of an aggressive type of cancer known as squamous cell carcinoma of the digit (SCDD). However, not all poodles are equally susceptible to SCDD. Dark colored poodles are at high risk of this cancer, while light colored dogs are almost never affected. Researchers recently found the genetic mutations that are likely responsible for the difference.

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