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AKC Canine Health Foundation-Funded Research on the Cutting Edge: Canine Osteosarcoma Patients Find Hope in Viral Therapy Treatment

05/27/2014

Engineering viruses to attack tumors is not strictly for human use, it is also being used in dogs. In research funded by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), Dr. Bruce Smith, VMD, PhD of Auburn University uses biotechnology to convert adenovirus, a common human and canine virus, into a treatment for canine osteosarcoma. Dr. Smith’s research reprograms a canine adenovirus to attack tumor cells and was funded by CHF in 2012, nearly two years prior to the recent clinical trial at the Mayo Clinic for human myeloma patients using the measles virus.

Patients in Dr. Smith’s clinical trial are administered an oncolytic adenovirus specifically engineered to replicate (make copies of itself) in canine osteosarcoma cells. "By engineering a common adenovirus virus to replicate in cancer cells, we can turn that cell into a factory that produces its own destruction," said Dr. Smith. The virus breaks down the cancer cells, reducing or eliminating the metastic lesions and hopefully extending the survival of dogs that receive this treatment. According to Dr. Smith, "Viruses are nature's perfect gene delivery machines. Oncolytic viruses harness this ability to deliver death to cancer cells." The implications for human medicine are profound. Canine osteosarcoma is an aggressive canine bone cancer with poor prognosis and is nearly identical to osteosarcoma in humans.

“CHF strives to fund cutting-edge technology that will prevent, treat and cure canine disease. Novel approaches to treating cancers such as the work done by Dr. Smith moves us forward in giant strides rather than incremental steps, and what seems like high risk science ultimately becomes high reward for dogs and their owners,” said Dr. Shila Nordone, CHF Chief Scientific Officer. “Dr. Smith’s research also has strong implications for humans. By utilizing naturally occurring disease in dogs we can move biomedical research forward more quickly and cost effectively for humans as well.” 

To learn more about Dr. Smith’s virus-based anti-tumor treatment for canine osteosarcoma and to support his research, visit the CHF website. Watch an interview with Dr. Smith discussing his research and the One Medicine approach in this video from Auburn University.

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Tips For Success With Fresh Chilled Semen Breedings, Part I: The Stud Dog

05/21/2015

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and our corporate alliance, Zoetis, are pleased to bring you another installment in a podcast series devoted to canine reproduction education for pet owners, breeders, and veterinarians.

In this podcast we discuss fresh chilled semen breeding, focusing on the stud dog. This podcast features Dr. Scarlette Gotwals, of Country Companion Animal Hospital in Morgantown Pennsylvania. Dr. Gotwals received her DVM from The Ohio State University in 1987. She has a special interest in canine reproduction and has been involved with canine reproduction and semen cryopreservation for 21 years. She is a nationally recognized authority in these areas and serves as a consultant to veterinarians through the Veterinarian Information Network. Dr. Gotwals is a consultant for the Canine Reproduction Division of Zoetis.

A transcript of this podcast is also available to read or download as a sharable PDF.

In June, part two of this podcast will be released, fresh chilled semen breeding, focusing on the bitch.


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