Displaying results 41 - 50 of 61 items found.

41. Lipid Profiles to Diagnose Atopy

(Web Page; Fri Jan 14 10:05:00 CST 2022)

Atopic dermatitis, or atopy, is the most common inflammatory skin disease in people and dogs. It is caused by an abnormal immune response to environmental allergens that penetrate the skin’s outer protective layer. Clinical signs i...

Description: Fat levels in blood and skin may be helpful to diagnose atopy in dogs.

42. Lopamudra Kher, BVSc&AH, MVSc, MS

(Web Page; Mon Nov 29 11:56:00 CST 2021)

Lopamudra Kher, BVSc&AH, MVSc, MS (CHF Grant 02924-E)Mentor: Domenico Santoro, DVM, MS, DrSc, PhD; University of FloridaDr. Kher completed her Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry and Master of Science degree in ve...

Description: Dr. Lopamudra Kher is a doctoral candidate in the Small Animal Clinical Sciences Department of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine.

43. Transcriptome Profiling of Canine Familial Dermatomyositis (DMS) Skin Lesions and Treatment

(Web Page; Thu Apr 08 07:34:00 CDT 2021)

Description:

Cutaneous dermatomyositis (DMS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease that exhibits severe inflammatory lesions leading to skin scarring with disfiguration. The inflammatory skin process in human DMS is characterized by an upregulated interferon signature and activation of Janus kinase (JAK) pathway; the JAK inhibitors represent a novel treatment modality for human cutaneous DMS. Presently, little is known about the pathogenesis of canine familial DMS-associated skin lesions in Collies and Shetland Sheepdogs and the treatment is rarely successful. Oclacitinib is safe and well-tolerated JAK inhibitor that has been used for the control or treatment of allergic dermatitis in dogs; however, the therapeutic effect of oclacitinib on canine familial DMS has not been investigated.

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the molecular signature of canine familial DMS using RNA sequencing. We will perform transcriptomic analyses of lesional skin biopsy specimens from 20 dogs (Collies, Shetland Sheepdogs) with familial DMS; biopsy specimens from 10 healthy dogs will serve as a control. Alignment of RNA-seq reads and detailed comparative analysis will be identified using software services. Furthermore, we will evaluate the effect of oclacitinib, a veterinary JAK inhibitor, on the modulation of the cutaneous DMS clinical signs in dogs in a 12-week open-label study. This is the first evaluation of a targeted immune JAK antagonist in dogs with familial DMS. The robust transcriptome analysis using RNA-seq will define novel pathogenic (innate, adaptive and inflammatory) pathways canine DMS disease drivers, with potential for the development of new targeted therapeutics.

Participation Requirements:

Client-owned Collies and Shetland Sheepdogs of any age, body weight and sex, with active cutaneous DMS diagnosed based on currently accepted standards (i.e. compatible history, clinical signs and microscopic demonstration of cell-poor interface dermatitis with vasculopathy, follicular atrophy and fibrosis on previous skin biopsy) will be enrolled into the study.

To limit the influence of medications on active DMS skin lesions, withdrawal times for all dogs from previous medications will be recommended to the client.

Owner's Responsibilities:

Once the patient is accepted into the study, the primary investigator will be in contact with the clients to organize a one-time skin biopsy collection procedure at a veterinary dermatologist clinic or a primary veterinarian clinic.  The primary investigator is responsible for the shipments of all materials. Samples can be sent from other clinics/owners.

If the clients pursue treatment with oclacitinib, the primary investigator will contact the clients directly with clinical scoring materials and the client will be responsible to bring the patient for a clinical visit rechecks to a veterinary dermatologist or a primary veterinarian.

44. Evaluation of Fungal Flora in Normal and Diseased Canine Ears

(Web Page; Fri Aug 16 12:36:00 CDT 2019)

Campbell, J. J., Coyner, K. S., Rankin, S. C., Lewis, T. P., Schick, A. E., & Shumaker, A. K. (2010). Evaluation of fungal flora in normal and diseased canine ears. Veterinary Dermatology, 21(6), 619–625. https://doi.org/10.111...

Description: Otitis externa is defined as inflammation of the ear canal and affects an estimated 10-20% of dogs. Otitis can be caused by numerous primary diseases and can be complicated by infections. Otitis can be a source of chronic pain and inflammation and until the primary cause is identified secondary bacterial or fungal infections will recur and perpetuate disease. It has been estimated that nearly 75% of otitis cases are due to primary atopic dermatitis (environmental allergy). When there is disruption of the skin�s natural barrier due to allergy secondary infections occur. Bacteria and fungal organisms such as Malassezia and Candida are commonly isolated as secondary pathogens in otitis while filamentous fungal organisms such as Aspergillus are less commonly isolated. 4, 8, 9, 10 These filamentous fungal organisms can be overlooked as exacerbating factors in serious otic disease. Currently there is limited knowledge on fungal flora that may be encountered in canine normal and diseased external ear canals in North America. In humans, fungal otitis may be under recognized in cases of chronic otitis externa, especially those cases treated with long term antibiotic therapy.11, 12 The purpose of this study is to isolate and identify pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungal organisms present in normal and diseased ears.

45. AKC Canine Health Foundation Announces 2015 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference August 7-9

(Web Page; Thu Aug 27 20:24:00 CDT 2015)

Nonprofit Celebrating 20 Years of Preventing, Treating, and Curing Diseases in All Dogs Partnering with Purina to Bring Latest Medical, Scientific Advances to Light The AKC Canine Health Foundation, celebrating 20 years of preventing,...

Description: The AKC Canine Health Foundation is pleased to announce it is hosting the 2015 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference August 7-9.

46. Laura Bryan, DVM

(Web Page; Wed Aug 21 07:52:00 CDT 2019)

Dr. Laura K. Bryan Dr. Laura K. Bryan is the 2014 AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellow from Texas A&M AgriLife Research. Dr. Bryan completed her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine at University of Georgia in 2011. ...

Description: Laura Bryan is the 2014 AKC Canine Health Foundation Clinician-Scientist Fellow from Texas A&M University.

47. AKC Canine Health Foundation Holds its First Virtual National Parent Club Canine Health Conference

(Web Page; Sat Aug 14 15:47:00 CDT 2021)

MEDIA CONTACT:Sharon M. Albright, DVM, CCRTManager of Communications & Veterinary OutreachAKC Canine Health FoundationPhone: 919-334-4019E-mail: sharon.albright@akcchf.orgNEWS RELEASEFor Immediate Release RALEIGH, NC (August 13,...

Description: The AKC Canine Health Foundation hosts its National Parent Club Canine Health Conference this weekend, August 13-15, virtually for the first time in the conference’s 24-year history

48. AKC Canine Health Foundation Receives Champion Sponsorship from The Kennel Club of Philadelphia

(Web Page; Thu Feb 17 15:34:00 CST 2022)

MEDIA CONTACT:Sharon M. Albright, DVM, CCRTManager of Communications & Veterinary OutreachAKC Canine Health FoundationPhone: 919-334-4019E-mail: sharon.albright@akcchf.org NEWS RELEASEFor Immediate Release RALEIGH, NC (February...

Description: The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the health of all dogs, announces a Champion Sponsor level gift from The Kennel Club of Philadelphia.

49. Transcriptome Profiling of Canine Familial Dermatomyositis Skin Lesions and Treatment with a JAK Inhibitor to Identify Novel Pathways Involved in Pathogenesis

(Web Page; Thu Apr 08 07:32:00 CDT 2021)

None at this time.

Description:

Dermatomyositis (DMS) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorder affecting primarily skin and muscle in both humans and dogs. Familial canine DMS is mainly described in predisposed breeds, such as Collies and Shetland Sheepdogs, and is characterized by severe inflammatory lesions leading to skin scarring with disfiguration, increased morbidity and decreased quality of life. Full clinical remission of DMS skin lesions can be difficult to achieve, reflecting a poor understanding of the pathogenesis of skin lesions in this disease. The transcriptome (gene expression analysis) investigation of human DMS tissues has revolutionized the understanding of the molecular fingerprint of DMS, further defining pathogenic immune pathways and identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Recently, a novel mechanism-based treatment using Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors has led to a significant clinical and molecular improvement in refractory cutaneous DMS in humans. Oclacitinib is a safe and well-tolerated JAK inhibitor that has been used for the treatment of allergic dermatitis in dogs; however, the therapeutic effect of oclacitinib on canine immune-mediated diseases, such as DMS, has not been investigated. The main objective of this study is to perform a large-scale molecular signature analysis of canine familial DMS. Investigators hypothesize that integrating deep sequencing-based transcriptome profiling with systems biology analysis will identify novel pathogenic pathways and inflammatory biomarkers as canine DMS disease drivers, with potential for the development of novel targeted therapeutics. Furthermore, they will evaluate the effect of oclacitinib, a novel veterinary JAK inhibitor, on the modulation of the cutaneous DMS clinical signs in dogs. These results may suggest that JAK inhibition has the potential to reverse canine DMS pathomechanisms, opening the door to a new era of targeted treatment for this debilitating inflammatory skin disease.

Funding for the research is provided through the collaborative efforts and generosity of the Collie Health Foundation and American Shetland Sheepdog Association. The AKC Canine Health Foundation supports the funding of this effort and will oversee grant administration and scientific progress.


Learn how you can participate in this research!

50. Diet-Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs

(Web Page; Wed Jan 15 08:05:00 CST 2020)

Trisha Brenner was shocked when her active, five-year-old Weimaraner named Charlie collapsed on a walk in November of 2018. “Charlie had been healthy, except for some allergic dermatitis symptoms he experienced as a young dog,&rdqu...

Description: Several research studies are underway to explore factors influencing the apparent increase in incidence of diet-related dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs, including a multi-institutional, prospective study supported by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF).

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