779: Characterization of the Canine Y Chromosome: Identifying Genes that Cause Male Infertility

Grant Status: Closed

Grant Amount: $203,344
Dr. William J. Murphy, PhD, Texas A&M University
July 1, 2007 - December 31, 2009
Sponsor(s): Affenpinscher Club of America, Akita Club of America, Inc., American Brittany Club, American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club Charitable Trust, American Lhasa Apso Club, American Shetland Sheepdog Association, Basenji Club of America, Inc. & Basenji Health Endowment, Bernese Mountain Dog Club of America, Bulldog Club of America Charitable Health Fund, Inc., Collie Health Foundation, English Setter Association of America, Inc., English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association, Field Spaniel Society of America, French Bulldog Club of America, German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America, Golden Retriever Foundation, Greyhound Club of America, Health & Rescue Foundation of the Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Club of America, Italian Greyhound Club of America, Labrador Retriever Club, Leonberger Health Foundation, Miniature Pinscher Club of America, Inc., National Amateur Retriever Club, National Beagle Club, Poodle Club of America Foundation, Pug Dog Club of America, Inc., Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of the United States, Scottish Terrier Club of America, Seminole Kennel Club, Silky Terrier Club of America, United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club, Inc., Welsh Terrier Club of America, Inc., Westie Foundation of America, Inc., Yorkshire Terrier Club of America Foundation, Inc.
Breed(s): -All Dogs
Research Program Area: Prevention

Project Summary

The causes of male infertility in dogs are not well known. Though much is now known about genes on the dog autosomes and X chromosome, owing to the canine genome sequence, virtually nothing is known about the canine Y chromosome and the genes it harbors. The causes of male infertility in dogs are not well known. Though much is now known about genes on the dog autosomes and X chromosome, owing to the canine genome sequence, virtually nothing is known about the canine Y chromosome and the genes it harbors. Studies of the human and mouse Y chromosomes have shown that they contain many testis-specific genes that when defective cause infertility and spermatogenesis defects. This study aimed to characterize the gene content of the dog Y chromosome by sequencing from a cDNA selection library that is enriched for Y chromosome gene transcripts, and mapping these in the canine genome. Dr. Murphy and his team identified gene sequences from fifteen canine Y chromosome genes, characterized seven new canine-specific Y genes, and 15 novel candidate genes. Determining the copy number and function of these novel genes are of primary importance, as they are primary infertility candidate genes. Gene expression experiments identified that eight of the novel dog genes are expressed only (or predominantly) in testes, implying a role in spermatogenesis. The researchers assembled a first-generation physical map in collaboration with the Washington University Genome Center, as a prerequisite to eventually obtain the sequence of the dog Y chromosome using Next-Generation DNA sequencing technologies, as funded by CHF grant 1262. A DNA sequence will allow the most detailed information for designing genetic tests to determine whether deletions in these genes lead to abnormal spermatogenesis in infertile dogs.

Help Future Generations of Dogs

Participate in canine health research by providing samples or by enrolling in a clinical trial. Samples are needed from healthy dogs and dogs affected by specific diseases.

Learn How to Help

Make an Investment Today:

  • $40
  • $60
  • $100
  • $250
  • Give Now
Connect With Us:
Get Canine Health News:
Please leave this field empty

© 2015 AKC Canine Health Foundation | Privacy Policy | Site Map

Site by Blackbaud, Inc.

Powered by Blackbaud
nonprofit software