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DNA Samples Needed from Scotties, Westies and Shelties

07/24/2013
Breed(s): Scottish Terrier, Shetland Sheepdog, West Highland White Terrier
Study Type: Blood Sample
Study Location: Ostrander Laboratory at the National Human Genome Research Institute at NIH, in collaboration with the Purdue Comparative Oncology program at Purdue University

Cancer is a major cause of death in older dogs and treatment is often ineffective. We wish to identify the causes of cancer in order to learn how to more effectively predict, prevent, and treat the disease. Genetic (heritable) factors are important in the development of Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. The Scottish and West Highland White terriers and the Shetland sheepdog are at high risk for TCC, suggesting that subsets of dogs from each of these breeds are born with errors in critical genes that predispose them to TCC. We wish to develop ways to identify the dogs with genetic risk factors for TCC before they get the disease. Dogs at risk could then either enter cancer prevention trials, undergo screening tests to detect cancer at its earliest state, and, in the future, possibly receive “genetic” therapy. We have found two regions of the genome where error-prone genes lie and have narrowed the first region to a few hundred bases in an interval that has only two genes. We are requesting continued support to allow us to find this mutation as well as fine map the remaining critical gene(s). To do this we need blood samples from dogs that have been diagnosed with TCC of the bladder as well as healthy dogs over the age of 10 that have never had any form of cancer.

More Information

 

Contact Information:
Erica Chapman
dog_genome@mail.nih.gov
301-451-9390
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