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AKC Canine Health Foundation Takes Significant First Step in Preventing Bloat in Dogs

10/07/2013

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) has taken a significant step toward the eventual prevention of the devastating condition commonly known as bloat. CHF is pleased to announce the approval of two research grants which will work to establish the causes and pre-dispositions for gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), or bloat. These studies will provide the insight necessary to one day prevent the condition.

The two grants will provide $485,000 in bloat research. The first study, headed by principal investigator Dr. Claire Rebecca Sharp, BVMS of Tufts University will evaluate the complex genetic basis of bloat. Importantly, Dr. Sharp’s grant will support the beginning of a biobank of samples that will facilitate the study of bloat by other investigators in the future. The second study, headed by principal investigator Dr. Laura L. Nelson, DVM of Michigan State University seeks to determine the abnormalities in the stomach’s ability to contract and how this might predispose large-breed dogs to bloat.

According to Dr. Shila Nordone, CHF Chief Scientific Officer, “Bloat is a major health concern for many dog owners and through our Bloat Initiative we aim to better understand this condition and ultimately equip veterinarians and dog owners with tools that will protect dogs from this devastating illness.” 

Gastric dilatation–volvulus, or bloat, can develop in any dog, although it is particularly common in large-breed and deep-chested dogs. Bloat develops when the stomach fills with air and then twists on itself, preventing air and liquid from leaving the stomach. Over time, the stomach gets larger and larger. This cuts off circulation and prevents blood from getting back to the heart from the rest of the abdomen and the rear legs. The stomach wall itself can also be severely damaged from loss of blood flow as can the spleen. Bloat requires immediate stabilization and prompt surgical correction, and may still be fatal in some severely affected dogs.

As part of the Bloat Initiative, CHF has released a free webinar which features Dr. Elizabeth Rozanski, a key opinion leader in the study of GDV. In this webinar Dr. Rozanski present the signs and treatment options for bloat along with current options for prevention.

CHF is grateful to the many breed clubs, individuals and foundations that have provided partial funding for these two grants. For a full list of Bloat Initiative sponsors, as well as information on how you can support this effort, please visit www.akcchf.org/bloat.

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CHF and Zoetis Reproduction Series: Pregnancy Diagnosis

11/24/2014

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and our corporate alliance, Zoetis, are pleased to bring you the seventh installment in a podcast series devoted to canine reproduction education for pet owners, breeders, and veterinarians.

In this podcast we discuss pregnancy diagnosis with reproductive specialist Dr. Autumn Davidson. Dr. Davidson obtained her BS and MS at the University of California, Berkeley, with an emphasis in wildlife ecology and management. She is a graduate of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and is board certified in Small Animal Internal Medicine. Dr. Davidson is currently a clinical professor at the School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis in the department of medicine and epidemiology where she specializes in small animal theriogenology (reproduction) and teaches students during their senior year. Dr. Davidson also practices at PetCare Veterinary Hospital East Campus in Santa Rosa, CA, and Lone Oak Veterinary Hospital in Three Rivers, CA, where she receives both internal medicine and reproduction cases.


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