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Articles

Feet on The Ground July 1, 2012

Part 3 in a four-part Series on Posture: Our brains, and those of our highly intelligent companion animals, are hard wired to interpret critical information through the soles of our feet, and the sensory nerves in our leg joints, tendons and muscles.

Pythiosis July 1, 2012

Sometimes referred to as "swamp cancer", Pyrhiosis is a relatively rare, but emerging infectious disease of domestic animals that is derived from an algae-like fungi that enters the body through the nose/ sinuses, esophagus or broken skin through contact with water.

Metronomic Chemotherapy May 9, 2012

Barbara Biller, DVM, PhD, an assistant professor of Oncology at CSU, recently tested a relatively new cancer treatment technique called metronomic chemotherapy. The study was funded in part by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF). Dr. Biller explained her research at CHF Breeder’s Symposium in Fort Collins, CO.

Disaster Preparedness for Animals with Special Health Needs May 7, 2012

Dr. Kelli Ferris, Assistant Professor at North Carolina College of Veterinary Medicine and Director of the Community-Campus Partnership, says that pet owners can take a few easy steps now to make sure the proper plans are in place should a disaster force them to quickly flee their home.

Survivin’ Canine Osteosarcoma May 4, 2012

Osteosarcoma is a particularly nasty form of cancer that affects both dogs and humans. The bone tumors it causes are extremely aggressive, frequently metastasize to other organs, and have a very high mortality rate. Even with treatment, the five year osteosarcoma survival rate in people is only 60 percent and the two year survival rate in dogs is even lower – a frightening 20 percent. New therapies for osteosarcoma are clearly needed, and so is a better way to test them

Leonberger Loses Fight with Hemangiosarcoma But Owners Battle On April 1, 2012

One morning, Einstein, an 8 ½ year old Leonberger, failed to make his way upstairs in anticipation for his morning walk. The unfortunately diagnosis was hemangiosarcoma. Unlike some of the other canine sarcomas, hemangiosarcomas are very invasive, fast-growing tumors that often migrate to the spleen, heart, liver, lungs, kidneys, muscle, lymph nodes or skin.

Focus on Canine Cancer Research April 1, 2012

Cancer can be a devastating diagnosis for both humans and our beloved canine companions. There are 77.5 million owned dogs in the United States and a fourth will develop cancer - including those in the bone, breast, pancreas, liver, prostate, lung, and skin.

Become Snake-Smart to Protect Your Dog March 1, 2012

Shy and rarely aggressive, snakes bite only when injured or sensing a threat - such as defending themselves against curious dogs. While all dogs are at risk for snake bites, field dogs are especially vulnerable as they probe holes in the ground, sniff under logs, explore riverbanks and dig up leafy patches on the forest floor

Canine Tick-Borne Disease February 27, 2012

Thousands of dogs are infected annually with dangerous tick-transmitted diseases - with the risk rising: Between 2006 and 2010, Veterinary Week reported a 30 percent increase in the rate of dogs exposed to tick-transmitted diseases. Ticks are parasites that attach themselves to dogs, feed on blood and transmit diseases directly into the dog’s system.

Oh, That Flexible Neck February 1, 2012

Part 2 in a Series on Posture: So, what are some of the reasons our dogs have trouble standing comfortably or “stacking” correctly? The upper neck, the feet, and dentition/skull shape turn out to be the biggest players in abnormal posture, because they are areas rich in nerve cells that report on the body’s relationship to gravity, especially that of the head and neck.

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Listen to the Latest Podcast

CHF and Zoetis Reproduction Series: Ovulation Timing

07/31/2014

The AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and our corporate alliance, Zoetis, are pleased to bring you the sixth installment in a podcast series devoted to canine reproduction education for pet owners, breeders, and veterinarians.

In this podcast we will be speaking with Dr. Scarlette Gotwals, of Country Companion Animal Hospital in Morgantown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Gotwals received her DVM from The Ohio State University in 1983. She has a special interest in canine reproduction and has been involved with canine reproduction and semen cryopreservation for 21 years. She is a nationally recognized authority in these areas and serves as a consultant to veterinarians through the Veterinarian Information Network. Dr. Gotwals is a consultant for the Canine Reproduction Division of Zoetis. In this podcast she will be discussing ovulation timing in the bitch as well as ways breeders can use data from heat cycles and whelping dates to understand more about ovulation timing.


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