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Articles

Beyond the Genome October 1, 2012

Beyond the genome, much progress has been made in our understanding of the regulation of health and disease. Developing a greater understanding of all of these mechanisms of disease development in the dog is critical and will likely help solve some of our most complex health problems – not just in dogs, but in humans too.

It's More than Just Bite! October 1, 2012

Part four of the four Series on Posture: Skull shape is one of the most biologically important variations in the dog, because changing the “default” cone-shaped head will change the size and shape of the brain case, the eyes, nose, teeth and airway. There are some health risks that are suspected to have associations with the size and shape of the dog’s head.

Brachycephalic Research Shows Body Condition Is Key to Thermoregulation September 19, 2012

Recent research by Michael Davis, D.V.M., professor of physiological sciences and director of the Comparative Exercise Physiology Laboratory at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, showed that a dog’s body condition score has an even greater impact on thermoregulation, or the ability to maintain a steady body temperature, than does being a brachycephalic breed. The AKC Canine Health Foundation and several parent clubs helped to fund the research.

Feet on The Ground July 1, 2012

Part 3 in a four-part Series on Posture: Our brains, and those of our highly intelligent companion animals, are hard wired to interpret critical information through the soles of our feet, and the sensory nerves in our leg joints, tendons and muscles.

Pythiosis July 1, 2012

Sometimes referred to as "swamp cancer", Pyrhiosis is a relatively rare, but emerging infectious disease of domestic animals that is derived from an algae-like fungi that enters the body through the nose/ sinuses, esophagus or broken skin through contact with water.

Metronomic Chemotherapy May 9, 2012

Barbara Biller, DVM, PhD, an assistant professor of Oncology at CSU, recently tested a relatively new cancer treatment technique called metronomic chemotherapy. The study was funded in part by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF). Dr. Biller explained her research at CHF Breeder’s Symposium in Fort Collins, CO.

Disaster Preparedness for Animals with Special Health Needs May 7, 2012

Dr. Kelli Ferris, Assistant Professor at North Carolina College of Veterinary Medicine and Director of the Community-Campus Partnership, says that pet owners can take a few easy steps now to make sure the proper plans are in place should a disaster force them to quickly flee their home.

Survivin’ Canine Osteosarcoma May 4, 2012

Osteosarcoma is a particularly nasty form of cancer that affects both dogs and humans. The bone tumors it causes are extremely aggressive, frequently metastasize to other organs, and have a very high mortality rate. Even with treatment, the five year osteosarcoma survival rate in people is only 60 percent and the two year survival rate in dogs is even lower – a frightening 20 percent. New therapies for osteosarcoma are clearly needed, and so is a better way to test them

Leonberger Loses Fight with Hemangiosarcoma But Owners Battle On April 1, 2012

One morning, Einstein, an 8 ½ year old Leonberger, failed to make his way upstairs in anticipation for his morning walk. The unfortunately diagnosis was hemangiosarcoma. Unlike some of the other canine sarcomas, hemangiosarcomas are very invasive, fast-growing tumors that often migrate to the spleen, heart, liver, lungs, kidneys, muscle, lymph nodes or skin.

Focus on Canine Cancer Research April 1, 2012

Cancer can be a devastating diagnosis for both humans and our beloved canine companions. There are 77.5 million owned dogs in the United States and a fourth will develop cancer - including those in the bone, breast, pancreas, liver, prostate, lung, and skin.

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The Benefits of Rehab for Senior and Geriatric Dogs

09/18/2014

In continuation of our “Old Dogs Rule” educational series, this podcast features Dr. Laurie McCauley, Medical Director of TOPS Veterinary Rehabilitation in Grayslake, IL. Dr. McCauley is certified in veterinary rehabilitation by the Canine Rehabilitation Institute, and is one of less than 100 veterinarians who is board certified in veterinary sports medicine and rehabilitation. She is also certified in veterinary acupuncture by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society and in animal chiropractic by the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association. In this podcast Dr. McCauley discusses the benefits of using rehabilitation medicine as a way to keep senior and geriatric dogs healthy and active.

This podcast was made possible thanks to the generous support of the Kenneth A. Scott Charitable Trust, A KeyBank Trust.


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