Webinars

We are pleased to present the following educational webinars. You may search for videos by research area or browse the complete list.

To access our VetVine webinar series, please click here.


Research Area
 

 

Vitamin D and Cancer

05/17/2012

Presentation by Rondo P. Middleton, PhD, Nestlé Purina Research, Senior Research Scientist, Pet Care Basic Research at the 2011 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

Health Testing in the AKC Breeder of Merit Program

Susan Hamil, AKC Delegate and AKC Canine Health Foundation Director, discusses health testing requirements in the AKC Breeder of Merit Program. This presentation was made at the 2011 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

Canine Oncology Clinical Trials

05/14/2012

Presentation by Douglas H. Thamm, VMD DACVIM, Colorado State University Animal Cancer Center Associate Professor & Barbara Cox Anthony Chair in Oncology and Director of Clinical Research at the 2011 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

This presentation answers the questions: What is a clinical trial? Why are clinical trials conducted in dogs with cancer? What are the different types of clinical trials? What are the phases of clinical trials? When are clinical trials appropriate for a pet? How can I find information about available clinical trials for dogs with cancer?

Factors Influencing Development of New Veterinary Medicine Oncology Products

05/10/2012

Presenation made by Karen Greenwood, BSc, Director, Companion Animal Internal Medicine Unit at Pfizer Animal Health at the 2011 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

Presenation Abstract:
The presentation will cover the process involved in identifying and registering new oncology treatments for canines and the factors that influence successful registration and launch. This will include observations on the challenge and complexity of development for agents specifically developed for pets versus off-label use of human health products, the MUMS (minor use, minor species) process as it relates to oncology, and the benefits of translational oncology for canine cancer patients.

Coping with Stress: Nutritional Approaches to Enhanced Immune Function

05/09/2012

Presentation at the 2011 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation given by Dr. Arleigh Reynolds, DVM, PhD, DACVN, Senior Research Scientist at Nestle Purina Research.

CHF Funded Lymphoma Research at Texas A&M University

04/20/2012

News story from ABC Nightly News about CHF-funded research on lymphoma taking place at Texas A&M University and MD Anderson Hospital.

Dalmatian Bladder Stones: not just a Dalmatian Problem

10/01/2009

Presentation by Danika Bannasch DVM, PhD, University of California, Davis at the 2009 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference hosted by the AKC Canine Health Foundation.

Presentation Abstract: Dogs, as well as other mammals, must excrete excess purine compounds in their urine. Most mammals excrete these excess purines in the form of allantoin; however humans, great apes and Dalmatians excrete uric acid instead. In dogs, uric acid excretion can lead to bladder stone formation. This problem in Dalmatians has been recognized for almost 100 years. We used a Dalmatian X Pointer cross to determine the location of the gene responsible and subsequently identified the mutation that causes this problem. As suspected from many years of research, all Dalmatians are homozygous (carry two copies) for the mutation. Interestingly, other breeds reported to have uric acid-containing bladder stones also have this same mutation (Bulldogs and Black Russian Terriers). In these breeds only some of the dogs are affected and genetic selection can be used to avoid producing affected dogs. This oddity of dog metabolism is not just restricted to these three breeds and in fact appears to be a very old mutation that occurs in many breeds. DNA testing is commercially available for uric acid excretion, or hyperuricosuria in dogs. However, DNA testing is not completely straightforward since the frequency of the mutation varies between breeds and not all dogs that are homozygous for the mutation will show clinical signs of bladder stones.

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